Clinical and Experimental Psychology

ISSN - 2471-2701

Abstract

Self-reported Attributes Associated with Cognition and Motivation as a Function of Gender

Trevor Archer, Ann-Christine Arntén, Klaus Olsen, Bengt Jansson

Male (n=4141) and Female (n=2648) participants in executive leadership recruitment self-report were compared with regard to their expressions of Cognition and Motivation levels derived from scores on the attributes, Focus on planning and Deliberation, and, Self-motivation and Winning instinct, respectively in each case. Although the male participants scored higher for both Cognition and Motivation parameters, the vast majority of attributes predicting or counter-predicting Cognition and Motivation, respectively, were similar among the male and female participants, i.e., gender did not separate these attributes. Self-motivation, self-control and focus on detail were predictive for cognition among women whereas mood stability and will-power were expressed among men; openness was counter-predictive for women and communicability for men. Among women, resilience and risk-taking were predictive for motivation whereas focus on details, development motivation and need for speed were expressed by men; openness was counter-predictive for women. Amongst the most predictive attributes for cognition, tolerant attitude was counterpredictive for women whereas risk-taking was expressed for men; for motivation, openness was counter-predictive for women whereas communicability was expressed for men. The findings are discussed from social cognitive organizational trends that permeate current notions of what may constitute an effective leadership “toolbox”.

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