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Surviving under pollution stress: Antibacterial and antifungal activities of the Oyster species (Magallana bilineata and Magallana cuttackensis) | Abstract

International Journal of Applied Biology and Pharmaceutical Technology

Abstract

Surviving under pollution stress: Antibacterial and antifungal activities of the Oyster species (Magallana bilineata and Magallana cuttackensis)

Malik Wajid H. Chan

Antibiotic effectively controls the bacterial and fungal infections. Pathogens developing multi-drug resistance are a global health concern, which necessitate developing new molecules to overcome the resistance dilemma. This study explores the intrinsic ability of marine oysters synthesizing bioactive compounds. The tissue extracts prepared in n-hexane from two oysters, Magallana bilineata and Magallana cuttackensis compared for broad spectral antimicrobial activates against the fungal, Gram positive and negative pathogens. Regardless, both the species tolerated the same pollution indices; the M. bilineata exhibits stronger antimicrobial activities as compared to M. cuttackensis. M. bilineata potentially inhibited the bacterial growth with minimal inhibitory concentration (0.75 to 20 µg/ml) and fungal pathogens (0.75-5 µg /ml) as compared to ciprofloxacin and miconazole. Inhibitory potential complimented with reduce bactericidal and fungicidal concentrations required to observed susceptible zone of inhibition (ZOI). The inhibition augmented with increased antimicrobial index (AMI) and total activity index (TAI) against the human pathogen than those of M. cuttackensis. It is widely acknowledged that there is a need to develop novel antimicrobial agents to minimize the threat of emerging multiple antimicrobial resistant pathogens. Therefore, the oysters surviving in the pollution stress modulate the physiological and immune response may exploit to develop potential antibiotics.

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